Sunday, April 15, 2012

No and rejection

When I decided to go indie and self publish, I gave up looking to query agents. I was kind of happy. I wouldn't have to deal with any rejections of my query. It was like a win! But there was always a little part of me that was bummed about that. An author's first rejection is like a badge of honor. Something you save and laugh at when your book finally gets published. When I was first contacted about Turkish rights for Being Human, I started looking at agents again. I might need one to deal with this if I got offered a contract. I had no idea if I'd hear back in time from any of the agents or at all. As stated in other blog posts, my query wasn't typical and if you don't follow submission guidelines, your query will end up in the trash. I did get a reply from one agent though.

My first rejection letter!

Now, it's not even personalized and made me wonder if they even read my email before shooting off the rejection letter despite their assurances that they did, but I have it. I have saved it and will probably read it once everything with the Turkish rights is settled aka I have the money in my bank account. It's probably unprofessional of me to post it here, eh? Of course, I'm not the most professional of people at times. I'll be good this time and not post it. You never know, there might be another moment I need to contact agents and I hear they do look at blogs and I should at least attempt to make a good impression.

Bookmark incentive: Let's share rejection stories! I'll pick one person to send a signed bookmark too.

12 comments:

  1. Before I decided to go indie myself I did submit a few short stories and novellas places. My first novella rejection ended up getting picked up by a different small, epub shortly afterwards. I've kept all my rejection letters do, but seeing a story go from one rejection, to an acceptance just reminded me how subjective reading can be.

    BTW, love Being Human's cover!

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    1. It can be quite subjective, which is a nice thing to remember when you get a rejection. ^^

      Thanks.

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  2. I still have my first rejection from an editor. It came in the mail, on paper, and I couldn't resist. And now, almost a year later, my short story still has not found a home at a magazine ;_;. But I've collected lots of rejections, some electronic and some postal, but have tossed most of them away. Simply because my dresser need more space.

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    1. Well, the first one is the only one worth keeping. ;)

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  3. I'm still trying for the traditional route, but if that doesn't work i'll go indie for sure.
    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com
    Happy A-Zing!

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  4. I sometimes wonder if people who hold the responsibility for sorting through anything - be it manuscripts or CVs - get a little (read a lot) jaded. I'm aware of people who have dumped piles of CVs without reading them and as such I wonder if this might also happen for manuscripts.

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    1. I have heard that agents look for a reason as soon as the first sentence to move on because they get so many manuscripts.

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  5. I got my first rejection last month. I got through it. I didn't even cry. I am proud of how well I handled it!

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    1. I didn't cry for mine either. I was bummed but a bit more excited about the fact that I had a first rejection. Probably helped that I had already pubbed my book myself. lol

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  6. I have a notebook full! I used to get upset. Now I'm just cynical and self-publishing, which I actually enjoy. I'm trying to visit all the A-Z Challenge Blogs this month. My alphabet is at myqualityday.blogspot.com

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  7. Since I decided early on to go indie, I've never solicited with agents. So, no rejection letters...

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